Shopify Ecosystem

Selling To Prospects Using An Effortless Experience With Kyle Coleman

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Selling to Prospects Using an Effortless Experience with Kyle Coleman TW

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In this episode of the Customer Service Secrets Podcast, Gabe Larsen is joined by guests Kyle Coleman from Clari and Vikas Bhambri from Kustomer to understand how to make purchasing software seamless for potential buyers. They discuss the importance of empathy and understanding the different types of customers for a SAAS company. Listen to the full episode to learn more.

Breaking Down the Demo Process

VP of Growth and Enablement at Clari, Kyle Coleman has a tremendous desire to help people and is well versed in how a software company should handle sales. In his experience evaluating a SAAS company’s software, Kyle finds that many organizations lack the presentation and demonstration skills necessary to hook buyers into finalizing their purchases. Noting that physical goods are easier to sell than that of intangible goods such as software, it’s vital that companies spend time evaluating their sales processes when dealing with potential clients. He emphasizes, “If you can really break down your process that granularly and think about it from the prospect side to optimize it that way, you’re going to see the results.” Breaking down the selling process into bite-sized pieces and optimizing each one is a great way to further enhance the demonstration phase. This in turn allows customers to fully experience the demonstration and get an in-depth feeling for the product; which any brand that is proud of their product should be drawing as much attention to it as possible.

Creating a Frictionless Experience

When purchasing a product online, it’s typically easier to find customer reviews, videos and images, as well as third party reviews for a tangible good. The same, however, cannot be so easily said about SAAS company products. It seems that most prospects of B2B companies are forced to search multiple pages to find information about the software they are shopping for. Most customers might not want to immediately contact a sales representative to learn more about their software, so it is crucial that leaders work to make the discovery process frictionless for potential buyers. Creating a frictionless process is no easy task and it takes great effort to polish an organization’s methods until prospect buyer success stories flow through. Helping leaders in their polishing, Kyle offers, “Make it as easy as possible for people to find out as much as possible about your product so that when you have those conversations, they’re as close to the bottom of the funnel as possible.” Companies that make their product information readily available and make it easy for customers to educate themselves on that product are more likely to win in competitive fields.

Adapting the Traditional SDR Role

Those in SDR roles are traditionally thought to be solely volume based and trained to bring in as many customers as possible. On that note, Kyle examines, “The role is way more strategic now. The capabilities of SDRs are far, far higher now, and therefore the expectations should be higher about what they are doing.” As the customer-scape changes, it’s important for companies to adapt to modern challenges and methods by updating role responsibilities internally. SDRs should now be focused on qualifying customers to partake in the software by asking the right questions and formulating a whole-picture take on what type of customer they are dealing with. If a customer is uneducated about the software, it’s part of the SDR’s job to unearth this information in their initial contact with that customer. Ultimately, customers experience everything during the sales process from pre-sale to post-sale and it is the company’s responsibility to make it effortless.

To learn more about selling to prospects using an effortless experience, check out the Customer Service Secrets podcast episode below, and be sure to subscribe for new episodes each Thursday.

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Full Episode Transcript:

If Your Prospects Want to Buy from You, Let Them! | With Kyle Coleman

TRANSCRIPT

Intro Voice: (00:04)

You’re listening to the Customer Service Secrets Podcast by Kustomer.

Gabe Larsen: (00:11)

All right, welcome everybody today. We’re going to be talking about if your prospects want to buy, you should probably let them and to do that we brought on two guests. We got Vikas Bhambri and Kyle Coleman. I’ll have them just take a minute and introduce themselves. Kyle, let’s start with you.

Kyle Coleman: (00:26)

Hey. Hello everybody. Thank you again, Gabe, for having me on. Super excited to be here. My name is Kyle Coleman. I am the VP of Growth and Enablement at Clari. So I lead a group of teams that are kind of, sort of sales and kind of, sort of marketing, but responsible for creating and accelerating revenue. So that’s demand gen, field marketing, sales development, and sales enablement all on our growth department.

Gabe Larsen: (00:46)

Geez. I thought I had a lot going on. [Inaudible] Vikas, take a second and introduce yourself.

Vikas Bhambri: (00:54)

Sure. Vikas Bhambri. Head of Sales and Customer Experience here at Kustomer and actually now a two time Clari customer. So used Clari both here at Kustomer and brought it into my previous company as well. So excited to have the conversation with Kyle.

Kyle Coleman: (01:09)

Love to hear that.

Gabe Larsen: (01:09)

Yeah. Yep. And then I’m Gabe, I’d run the marketing over here at Kustomer. So Kyle, first and foremost, I got to ask, what’s the secret to being a LinkedIn influencer? You’re basically a LinkedIn influencer. Like this guy’s getting a lot of views and posts and Vikas and I want to be, so what’s the, what’s your secret? That’s what I really want to ask you.

Kyle Coleman: (01:32)

You know, it’s funny. I started to create a New Year’s resolution for myself, where I wanted to just sit down and think and write with no distractions, no devices, nothing. And so I started doing that in January and it turns out the only thing I think and write about is work. And so I, this LinkedIn just became kind of the perfect outlet for me. And I realized that I have a real desire for helping people. And if I can give people some tips that help them do their job, one, help one person do their job slightly better, it’s a worthwhile endeavor for me. And so that’s what’s motivating. It’s all about consistency, making it actionable, making it digestible, making it easy to read. So, nothing specific but it just takes effort,

Gabe Larsen: (02:16)

But you did actually get some award or something, right? I mean, it was like a LinkedIn influencer award or something, right?

Kyle Coleman: (02:22)

Yeah. Yeah. I got, I had the most engagement over some certain window of time in some kind of strange algorithmic way. I was the number one sales star. So I got that little award and then the next time they ran it, I was nowhere near the top. So it was just luck of the draw.

Gabe Larsen: (02:40)

Get you a little plastic trophy or something like that.

Kyle Coleman: (02:42)

Yeah, exactly.

Gabe Larsen: (02:44)

So that’s kind of what crossed Vikas’ and I purview was one of your LinkedIn posts and it certainly was a hot button for us. But really under this umbrella of customers who want to buy, how do we make it easy? I think there’s just, I thought this such a strong example because oftentimes we look at things from our perspective and what ultimately happens is we make it difficult for the customer. We don’t realize that it’s difficult for the customer. And you kind of pointed out a pre-sales interaction often found in technology companies that I feel like really alluded or highlighted this point. Any chance you can kind of take us through it then let’s break it down.

Kyle Coleman: (03:21)

Yeah, sure thing. So it is the demo request process which is just so broken and so many companies that when I’m trying to evaluate software, the number one place that I’m going to go is to see the product in action. I want a demo because I want to see it. Like a lot of times the aha moment, you can’t really get that in a white paper, just looking through a website or whatever it is so requested demo. Every single tech company in the universe is doing this to some extent. And what I have found as I’ve evaluated dozens and dozens of different software vendors is this pattern is unfortunately pretty common where I request a demo, I get followed up by an SDR a couple of minutes, or sometimes a couple hours later, they talked to me for about 10 minutes on the phone and I’m feeling pretty good. I’m like, “Okay, this company has a pretty good process. They now know what I need.” We get time on the calendar. And then I get set up with the AE and the AE asks me the same exact questions that the SDR already asked me. And I just feel like I’m now wasting my time. It feels repetitive and more important, I’m not getting the demos still. So now I’ve had a conversation with an SDR. I’ve had a conversation with an AE and I still haven’t actually seen the product. I haven’t learned anything new. So now we’re at the tail end of the call with the AE and he or she finally shows the demo, I get a two minute or five minute overview, and then we’d run that at a time. And they expect us, they say, “We’ll do a deeper dive on the next call with an SE.”

Kyle Coleman: (04:45)

And I’m like, “That’s not what I want to do. I want to learn about the product.” And so by that point, I pretty much will have lost faith unless I have some really strong testimonial from somebody I know and trust that the product is really killer. I’ll have lost faith and I’ll move on to the next competitor because there’s always a next competitor. And just hope that I have a better experience because what I’m thinking, Gabe, is that if they’re going to treat me like this now when I want to buy, what happens when I’ve bought and they already have my money? What’s the experience going to be like for me then? And I can’t imagine it’s going to get any better. And so that’s kind of what’s going on in my brain and part of the reason this is so important.

Gabe Larsen: (05:24)

Yeah. Well that definitely, I know it struck a chord with me because I’ve lived and breathed and kind of eaten some of that type of medicine. Vikas, what’s your response to that?

Vikas Bhambri: (05:34)

Yeah. I’m curious, Kyle, I mean, you know this because obviously you guys are in the same space, right? As a B2B SAAS company, what’s your perspective on the fact that, there are people out there who are quote unquote tire-kickers and the reason that you’re being asked, whether it’s the SDR with their 10 minutes or the AE, is to make that you’re seriously interested. And then the other thing I would say is, so that’s my first question. The second is I would say if the data that you’re sharing doesn’t end up in a better experience, then yes, it’s a wasted exercise, but are they using this data so that when you actually do see the product, there is a, something that’s tailored to you? Now, if the product is completely a horizontal product and it doesn’t matter who you are, then I would question, why do we even need people involved? So a couple of questions there before we continue.

Kyle Coleman: (06:30)

Yeah, sure thing. So my response to that, Vikas, is that this is the role of the SDR and I think a major miss in the way that the expectations that a lot of, especially senior leaders have about SDRs, is that they’re just playing a volume game. They’re just playing a quantity-based game and they can send emails and they can make a lot of phone calls and they can hand things off to AEs and that’s all that SDRs can do. And that’s not the case anymore. And maybe it was the case in the predictable revenue type model popularized by Salesforce in the two thousands and 20, early 2010s. But the role is way more strategic now. The capabilities of SDRs are far, far higher now, and therefore the expectations should be higher about what they are doing. What is their role? The role isn’t just to move things along from one stage in the journey to the next. It is to qualify, to ask questions, to do discovery, to understand, to gather the important data from me when I’m the buyer, so that when they hand it off to the AE, the AE can skip the discovery and go right into a demo that’s tailored to what the SDR learned about me. And the companies that do that well and are focusing on enabling and empowering SDRs to ask those types of questions, they accelerate the customer journey. They accelerate your prospect experience. And that’s how they can really frankly, skip a couple steps and ultimately save some time is just by enabling a group of people to do their job slightly differently, with more intent and more strategy.

Gabe Larsen: (07:55)

Yeah. I wanted to follow up on one piece on that and even go one step further back on the marketing side. Do you show your product? Do you not show it? Do you force to get a demonstration, the credit card information, the firstborn child, social security number? What questions do you ask to see products? Because in SAAS and sometimes I think in other businesses, do you show pricing? Do you not show pricing, right? Do you show the product? Do you hide the product behind the gate? Do you, how much do you give and take? I’m wondering your feedback on enabling buyers on that part of the process to maybe find out, learn more maybe without having to give up so much information. Where do you go on that?

Kyle Coleman: (08:40)

I’m pretty radical on this front. I think, as compared to many others, the way that many other demand gen leaders will think about things, I don’t care at all about MQLs. I think that MQLs are the sales equivalent of busy work. Like grade school busy work where we’re just creating MQLs and we’re handing it off because it makes us feel good as a marketing team, as a demand gen team. And so I don’t subscribe to that whatsoever. I think we have way more tools and technology at our disposal now than we’ve had before, where we can think more holistically about marketing qualified accounts and what suite of behaviors from a set of prospects are equivalent or make up an account that we want to go after. Therefore, my answer to your question, Gabe, is make it as easy as possible for people to find out as much as possible about your product so that when you have those conversations, they’re as close to the bottom of the funnel as possible.

Kyle Coleman: (09:37)

Buyers want to do research themselves. They are frustrated when they can’t find answers and there’s some crazy stat like they’ve done 60% of the research before they even reach out to an AE or to an SDR these days. And so you want to make your content as easy to consume as possible. Don’t put up that gate with 20 different form fields with all the things you mentioned, your mother’s maiden name. And I’m like, “Why? Why are you doing that?” If you have a con, if you’re confident in your content, if you’re confident in your product, let as many people see it as possible and let that content speak for itself. And then again, if you have the more sophisticated means of assessing the set of behaviors that’s leading to a qualified account, hopefully there are enough people within that account that are doing that type of research. That’s your cue to then go reach out to them and to try and spark a larger conversation.

Gabe Larsen: (10:26)

Yeah, I think Vikas, I mean, there’s a principle here. That’s the tactics I think can be debated all day. Some people are winning with this. Some people are not winning this, but there’s a principle here that is, what’s like the title of today’s session, which is if someone wants to buy from you kind of let them do that. As you kind of look at other brands in the market, other companies in market, maybe not just in B2B, you feel like this is also a challenge of people wanting to potentially buy from a retail brand or a financial services brand, but ultimately having a difficulty being able to find it, experience it, touch it, feel it, taste it? Your thoughts on that Vikas?

Vikas Bhambri: (11:01)

I think what Kyle is pointing out is the consumerization, right, of data. And I think we’re just so used to, for example, I want to go buy an above ground pool. When I go to Amazon, I can look at not only everything about the product, I can see videos of people in the pool to figure out is it appropriate for my kids’ ages, right? I can research the dimensions of the pool. How easy is it to set up? I can actually go through the instructions of setting up the pool because somebody like me, I absolutely need to know what it’s going to take before I buy something. I can look at reviews, right? I can look at third party reviews. I can, all of that data is available to me.

Vikas Bhambri: (11:45)

Why is it when I go to buy software, all of a sudden, it’s like, “Here is our high level kind of brand pitch. And that’s all you’re going to know about us.” It’s just counter to how we purchase today. And it’s really interesting, Kyle, that one of the things we talk about on the customer support side is think about yourself in the customer’s shoes. Think about, but we don’t do that on the sales side. Like we, to your point and I think you addressed it appropriately. It was like, look, there was a process that was defined. If you look at Salesforce, right, 20 something years ago, even greater. And we’re, a lot of software companies are still replicating that process today and it hasn’t moved on. So now what’s happened is customers are like, “I want to know about you. You’re not going to share anything with me. I’m going to go to G2 Crowd.”

Kyle Coleman: (12:42)

Yep.

Vikas Bhambri: (12:42)

“I’m going to go ring my friend. I’m going to go. I looked up one of your references. I’ve got a friend of a friend who works there and I’m going to reach out to them,” right? So you’re actually, you creating those barriers to entry is going to drive people away even further. And into your point, Kyle, they’re going to give up. If you make it too difficult, at some point they’re going to give up and the winner will be the brand or the person that makes it easiest. We talk about easy to do business with in the negotiation sales, end of the sales cycle, but who makes it easy to do business with at that front?

Gabe Larsen: (13:18)

I don’t know if we thought through that enough and I loved your statement. It’s like the consumerization of the B2B and the B2C buyer, right? Because everything we’ve done in B2C with Amazon has set our expectations, that it’s going to be easy on the front end. It’s going to, we’re going to be able to go see all those Q and A’s and almost like G2 Crowd, right? You get to see the dimensions of the pool and what it works with and what not works. And then oftentimes, and I don’t think this is just me, I think B2B is worse than B2C, but we do go to a company’s website wanting to buy something and we can’t find that. We can’t, we go to B2B and you’re damn right when it comes to B2B it’s like, you can’t find anything without giving stuff away.

Gabe Larsen: (14:02)

And we’ve kind of set the standard that that is impossible yet the expectation of the buyer is something that they’ve gotten from Amazon. And so Vikas, it’s interesting. You and I work in this space of customer service. We’re all so focused on that once the customer has purchased, how do we make sure that customer journey is optimized? But man, are we putting enough effort on that front end to make sure that we can allow them to do what they want to do? Self-serve, be educated before they buy, and ultimately maybe make the decision themselves without having to interact with us 50 times or even interact with a salesperson, right? Well, Kyle, do you feel like this is just a B2B thing, or have you experienced this in other industries, other areas? What’s kind of your take on that?

Kyle Coleman: (14:46)

Yeah, I think it’s probably both. I know that it’s both. I think that to your point though, Gabe, B2C companies obsess over it way, way more, and they, it’s their lifeblood. Like they don’t have an excuse to not pay attention to not just the funnel, but the conversion steps within the funnel for everything to be both efficient and effective. And they can run more experiments and like, I think B2C does a better job of this and B2B excuses ourselves, because it’s more, there are more humans involved and we say, “Oh, these are processes where we can’t control everything because there are different handoff points. And like, it’s just too complicated. And we can’t look at all that data and you know what? We could tell them to do something, but it’s still a human and they’re just not going to follow.” So we make excuses for ourselves in the B2B realm, I think way or more so and it’s a shame because I think Vikas hit on it.

Kyle Coleman: (15:39)

It’s a, to me it’s, this is what empathy is in sales. I know empathy is a hot topic right now in the COVID era, but that’s what it is. Putting yourself in your prospect’s shoes, in your buyer’s shoes and thinking about what their experience is. I think that a huge mistake that companies make right now is they think about what do SDRs need to do in a silo to make that SDR team as efficient as possible to get as many leads from MQL to first meeting as possible? And that’s what we’re going to focus on. We’re going to train them on the phone skills to sell the meeting, and they just optimize for the wrong metric, instead of thinking about how to make that SDR team as effective as possible, which is run the right discovery, get the right qualification, pass that information on to AEs, nurture that prospect between the call and the first meeting and set that up for success. And so there’s a big discrepancy between efficiency, which is such an obsession of go to market teams and efficacy, which falls by the wayside because it’s so much more effort.

Gabe Larsen: (16:43)

Yeah, no. I think there’s a lot of, Vikas –

Vikas Bhambri: (16:47)

Yeah. I think it makes, I think it makes it really interesting. And when you think about the role, Kyle mentions the SDR role, I would even say the sales role, what is the role of an account executive?

Gabe Larsen: (16:58)

Yeah.

Vikas Bhambri: (16:58)

And I think that also creates a nuance. Now I will say one thing though, because we’ve been talking about this educated buyer in the industry, corporate visions really was one of the key proponents of this, I would go even back as far as eight to 10 years ago. I would question how educated the buyer always is. And the concern I have is if we optimize for this buyer, like Kyle, who goes and does his due diligence and goes and looks at the website and tries to figure things out. Now we’ve got the challenge where that’s not always the case. And I would act, where all I’m disappointed is this thing about, what we’ve been talking in the industry about, 80% of buyers do their research before they engage a salesperson. That’s actually not true. And so a lot of buyers are like, “I just want to talk to a salesperson because I don’t want to go look at your website. I don’t want to go read your white paper. I don’t want to go look at this.” And so if you optimize for a Kyle, what happens when you get that quote unquote lazy buyer who’s like, “Just tell me what your product does,” because I showed up to meetings and it’s like, the person literally wants you to regurgitate the feature function. And you’re like, “Well, you can go see that on my website. We literally, on our pricing page, have every feature laid out, that’s in the packet,” right? And you don’t want to talk, you want to talk about business value. You want to talk about how do we help your business go from A to B? And they’re like, “But did your product do this?” And you’re like, “Yeah, it’s on our website.” Like, we don’t have to have an hour meeting to talk about that. Kyle, what’s your point, what’s your perspective on people who aren’t like you and don’t have that diligence?

Kyle Coleman: (18:40)

Yeah it’s a good question.

Gabe Larsen: (18:40)

See Kyle, you’re not actually, we’re only halfway through. Why are you alive Kyle? I’m sorry [inaudible]. It’s important, give it to them.

Kyle Coleman: (18:52)

I think it goes back to what, how you train the SDRs. How you think about that first interaction. And maybe it’s not SDRs. If you don’t have SDRs, then how do you train AEs to handle that kind of inbound demand? But let’s go even further up the funnel and say, optimize your site to give that person a channel to your sales team. When was the last time you saw a contact sales button on a B2B website? Like they seem to have disappeared. So try that. Maybe put that button up and run some experiments and see if that’s something that works for you. And think about your content from a content marketing and demand generation standpoint, as far as where, what it’s place is in the funnel. What’s your top of funnel thought leadership content? What’s your bottom of funnel, conversion content and gate that bottom of funnel conversion content, because you know that this is the type of content that people will look at when they’re ready to make a purchase decision. And so you can sort of prioritize who you follow up with that way, but again, it takes intent. It takes experimentation and there’s no easy answer. But I would say just train your sales team and SDR team to ask those questions, Vikas, so you can understand what type of buyer is this? Are they a value-based buyer that’s focused on the strategic vision of their company and they want to assess your products fit with that strategic vision? Or are they kind of a use case champion? Individual user who is a feature function oriented type person? And an SDR or an AE should be able to suss that out on an initial five to ten minute discovery call.

Vikas Bhambri: (20:24)

I love it. Love it.

Gabe Larsen: (20:24)

The other thing I like and, Vikas, you tipped me off to this not long ago, but, and I’m hearing it obviously on this side of the fence, which is the customer service journey, right? Like how do you map the journey of the customer? Because I think one thing you’ll find is you might be dealing with two different buyers, to kind of Kyle’s point, right? You might have an inbound buyer who’s requesting a demo who is very educated and maybe needs to be handled slightly different. In other cases in software companies, you go outbound to somebody who maybe is less educated and treating them similar to the person who just came through your website is very educated. Excuse me? They’re totally in two different worlds. They’re different parts of the process. And so expecting everybody to be on the exact same journey or to be the exact same buyer, and I’m not saying you need to have 50 paths, but maybe there are two. Maybe there are three and that way you actually optimize to that path. You might actually experience some differences and I know, Vikas, you kind of were chatting about –

Vikas Bhambri: (21:23)

No, I love, Kyle was definitely, made me think about, I go back to the post-sale experience and one of the things that in B2B we talk about now when I sit down with my professional services team is they not, they categorize customers, not just by the segment or the number of licenses they purchased. They actually look like technical affinity, right? They look at that because if somebody is really a tech savvy organization, then we can do a lighter touch. We can let them go and kind of do 80% of the tasks themselves versus somebody who’s not tech savvy, we got to do 80% of the activities. I think that’s another lens because I think on the sales side or sales and marketing side, we’ve often thought about buyer persona and very high level, right? You’ve got maybe a business buyer, you’ve got an IT buyer and I think what the lens that Kyle’s putting on it is, you’ve got that business buyer, but is it an educated business buyer versus an uneducated? And you almost, so, yeah, you don’t want to end up with 50 paths because it can get quite cumbersome. But I do think having that lens of how the buyer wants to buy is extremely important as you orchestrate your kind of go to market flow.

Kyle Coleman: (22:41)

I agree, Vikas, and I think a useful way of thinking about this is you need to attract people off, more often than not with persona-based messaging, but you need to speak with them and run the sales cycle with person-based messaging. How are I? I want to deal with this person as an individual, not as a persona with a set of characteristics that my product marketing team told me about, but as a person that is having an experience right now that has expectations, individual expectations. And so that’s a major difference that one, A, at the end of the word makes a big difference. But if you can find the right balance between the two on your sales and marketing and go to market strategy, you’re going to see the results pretty much immediately.

Gabe Larsen: (23:22)

Alrighty. Well I’m feeling like we’ve solved the world’s problems. I’m feeling comfortable.

Vikas Bhambri: (23:26)

Well, I tell you if that’s the one takeaway everybody has from this conversation. Just send us the royalty check because we’re going to make millions off of it.

Gabe Larsen: (23:38)

No check. We’re not even using checks. Like you could use –

Vikas Bhambri: (23:42)

I’ll post my Venmo on LinkedIn.

Gabe Larsen: (23:43)

All right, well we did hit a lot of different topics here. Just kind of summary thoughts from both of you. As we think about, I know we had some tactical things, but about this idea of enabling the buyer. Buyer enablement, customer journey optimization, pre-sales, not just post-sales. Let’s start with you, Vikas, and Kyle, maybe we can end with you.

Vikas Bhambri: (24:03)

Sure. I mean, look, I think for, you have to think about your buyer journey. And I think what Kyle is saying is really through the lens of the buyer and maybe different types of buyers, right? And understanding how do you make this process as frictionless as possible? Because if you don’t and somebody else does, then whether they have the best product out there or not, they’re going to win the game. And I know this from my own experience, right? When SAAS came to be back in the old days, because I’m a dinosaur, at Oracle, we were like, “Look, this is a fad. There’s nothing to it.” What SAAS did in the early days was it just made it easy for a buyer. Like I can go buy five licenses and now I’m a big enterprise I can get started and grow from there. And we were like, “Nobody’s ever going to buy software that way.” Well, it changed. That was fundamentally flawed, right? And then kind of gave the market to a small company called Salesforce. So I think from that perspective, it’s that time for reinvention again, to say, “How does the modern buyer now used to SAAS actually want to buy going forward?” And I think that’s going to be super interesting in the days ahead.

Kyle Coleman: (25:20)

Yeah, totally. Totally agree. Yeah. I would say for com, I totally agree with what Vikas said and maybe to get a bit more tactical to give people something to kind of think about and maybe take home is, think about the experience as the buyer, as the prospect. What happens when I request a demo on your site? And think about it, I’m the buyer now. I go and I request a demo and then I’m just sitting there waiting and what am I doing while I wait? And how can you improve that experience? Okay. Or I just get off the phone with an SDR and I have a meeting set five, seven days from now. What happens in the meantime? What happens in that five to seven days? What would matter to the prospect? If you were the prospect, what would you want? You should have some sort of pre-meeting drip that’s giving them content that they care about that’s aligned with the discovery and the qualification that was uncovered by the SDR. Now, after that first demo, I have a next step where we’re going to bring more people into the meeting. What, from the prospects I do, I want to happen in that next meeting and in the time in between? And if you can think about all the little stages in between, just optimize them one at a time, one at a time, because it’s going to take a while. But if you can really break down your process that granularly and think about it from the prospect side to optimize it that way, you’re going to see the results.

Gabe Larsen: (26:37)

Well, you given me a lot of work, Kyle. So I don’t really like this.

Vikas Bhambri: (26:42)

I was about to say, “Gabe, we got to go fix it.”

Gabe Larsen: (26:47)

[Inaudible] on the phone because now he’s going to hold me accountable to hearing a lot of things.

Vikas Bhambri: (26:51)

I heard MQLs. Don’t worry about MQLs.

Gabe Larsen: (26:55)

No, but I mean, truthfully, you guys, you know? No, I don’t know if anybody has the answer. It’s always great to have people like Kyle, come on and talk about a different purview. Especially when it comes to this customer journey. Don’t forget the pre-sales. Don’t forget the post-sales. Customers experience both of them, so we should optimize both of them. So that’s great. Guys, thanks for joining. Kyle, for taking the time. Vikas, as always, great to have you on board and for the audience to have a fantastic day.

Kyle Coleman: (27:20)

Thanks so much, guys.

Exit Voice: (27:26)

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Special thanks to our friends at Kustomer for their insights on this topic.
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